Ford Rolling Out Pre-Collision Assist System with Pedestrian Detection

Most newish model vehicles can detect oncoming traffic, lane lines, and curbs. But, if you’ve ever relied on them to detect motorcycles and pedestrians, you’ll find that many lack the finely tuned radar to do so. Ford announced this week that they’ll be rolling out their new Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection that will advance their already-on-the-market collision avoidance technology.

Using radar and camera technology to scan the roadway ahead, the system works by providing a warning to the driver if a collision risk with a vehicle or pedestrian is detected. According to Ford, “If the driver does not respond in time, the system can automatically apply up to full braking force to help reduce the severity of or even eliminate some frontal collisions.”

How does it work? Instantaneously, the system processes information collected from a windshield-mounted camera and radar located near the bumper checking it against a database of pedestrian shapes to help distinguish people from typical roadside scenery and objects. If a collision risk is detected, the system provides a warning to the driver. If the driver does not respond in a set timeframe based on speed, the system can automatically apply up to full braking force to help reduce the severity of or even eliminate some frontal collisions.

“This technology adds to the already impressive list of driver-assist technologies Ford customers benefit from today,” said Raj Nair, Ford group vice president, Global Product Development.

Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection will debut as available technology on the 2015 Ford Mondeo on sale in Europe this year. It will then roll out to other Ford and Lincoln products around the world.

image courtesy of Ford Motor Company

 

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s